Wind Energy Basics

May 25, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

This video provides an overview of the National Wind Technology Center and its research. Video produced for NREL by Fireside Production. We have been harnessing the wind’s energy for hundreds of years. From old Holland to farms in the United States, windmills have been used for pumping water or grinding grain. Today, the windmill’s modern equivalent—a wind turbine—can use the wind’s energy to generate electricity. How It Works Wind turbines, like windmills, are mounted on a tower to capture the most energy. At 100 feet (30 meters) or more aboveground, they can take advantage of the faster and less turbulent wind. Turbines catch the wind’s energy with their propeller-like blades. Usually, two or three blades are mounted on a shaft to form a rotor. A blade acts much like an airplane wing. When the wind blows, a pocket of low-pressure air forms on the downwind side of the blade. The low-pressure air pocket then pulls the blade toward it, causing the rotor to turn. This is called lift. The force of the lift is actually much stronger than the wind’s force against the front side of the blade, which is called drag. The combination of lift and drag causes the rotor to spin like a propeller, and the turning shaft spins a generator to make electricity.

Wind Turbine PVC Blade Design

May 14, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

Video which quickly describes one method which can be used to make a PVC blade.

Wind turbine explodes

April 21, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

www.windaction.org – Windmill collapse during a storm in Denmark. The braking system failed while two technicians worked in the turret at the top. The technicians were able to get out before the collapse. A 19 meter piece of the blade was thrown 20 metres away; Smaller pieces were sent more than 500 meters away.