Sueing Your HOA So You Can Install Solar Panels

May 14, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

www.solardave.com John Forbes: The year before last (2007) Xcel (Energy) had been sending out these mailers with your bill and they were talking about their solar credit program, and I have been really interested in all things solar. I tell people that I had in the 8th grade in 1958 I was standing up in front of the class giving them my science presentation and telling them I wanted to be a solarologist. My science fair project I had a big solar cooker made out of card board and tin foil. The next year I did one with corala algae and composting that in to methane and generating electricity from that, so I was really interested into it a long long time ago. The prices were prohibitive and the products really were not available anyway. So I say this an I was really intrigued and the Cary Hayes and REC Solar showed up at Costco. My wife had seen him and and she said he still might be there and I got home from work and Costco was open a little later. And she took me down there and she met him. OK, I gotta do it. And from then it was September of 2007 and I thought I would just put in my application to the Architectural Committee (Rock Creek HOA) because I had to do that for the yard and the deck and you are supposed get a 45 day turn around. Well when I didn’t get it by October – I went to inquire, I was told you can show up at the next meeting by that time – I check and gave them a little more time back in December or November I think they were skipping December and going in

Wind turbines and health problems

May 1, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

Windmills may be an environmentally friendly alternative energy source but they also cause debilitating health problems, say people who live near them. Wind turbines are popping up in rural communities around the world, including Canada, in the hope that they will reduce reliance on coal and other sources for power. Currently, there are about 1500 turbines across Canada and there are plans to build another 1000 to 1500 in the next year. But some residents who live near wind farms complain the turbines cause a number of adverse health effects, such as crippling headaches, nose bleeds and a constant ringing in the ears. Helen and Bill Fraser initially supported the nearby wind farm in Melancthon, Ont. One turbine sat close to the Fraser’s kitchen window. “We thought, more green energy, this is great,” Helen told CTV News.However, Helen says she developed headaches, body aches and she had trouble sleeping. The dog began wetting the floor at night. www.windaction.org

DIY Solar Panel System Cost

April 20, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

www.solardave.com SolarDave: Please tell me about your solar panel system and how you saved some money? Adam Stevenson: The total of the system and materials was K. I ended up spending about another 00 in permit fees and a structural engineer and 0 for an electrician, several hundred dollars for a guy to come help me out for the two afternoons he spent with me. Xcel (Energy) gave me 538 rebate. Fix cost based on the number of kilowatts you are installing and has nothing to do with how much you pay the permit office or the electrician. My final cost after rebate was 37. (SolarDave note: that is cheap!) I started my research in solar probably about a year before I actually installed it went and got a couple of bids from some of the local solar people both from contractors that my friends have used as well as just searching the internet and while talking to one of the guys I find of developed a good feeling from him, and I asked the question “Would it be possible to do some of the work myself” and kind of learn along the way he said “Sure I absolutely support the do-it-yourself-er (DIY) so I said why don’t you throw me bids, what it would cost just come home and have solar one day and what it would cost to have it done where I do some or all the work myself. And throw them both to me and I said let’s try the second one. The guys name is Steve Cross from Sun Spot Solar. I gave him my electric bills and said this is how much I think I need to generate and he

Home Wind Turbine

April 14, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

WindEnergy7.com – Home Wind Turbines, We patented the home wind turbine kit for people to easily install and deploy a home wind turbine. Home wind turbines for business, farm, and residential. Our home wind turbine is a precision machined and well balanced home wind turbine. Our patented rooftop home wind turbine kits have hybrid wind technology. We invented the only rooftop home wind turbine that’s safe and quiet for your home, certified in every state to 130mph. WindEnergy7 LLC is an Ohio based manufacturer of home wind turbine kits that are sold online. We hold patents for our home wind turbine inventions, home wind turbine kits that make rooftop wind possible. We have a growing dealer network of individuals in the US who use our home wind turbines, an installed base stretching from Hawaii to Massachusetts, Canada, Europe. Many customers have found it easy to become customer/dealers with our home wind turbine training. Our home wind turbine systems all qualify for the IRS 30% small wind tax credit which pays for 30% of your home wind turbine and installation costs.

Solar Power: Expensive, But Worth It

August 24, 2009 by  
Filed under Wind And Solar Energy

You may have noticed that over recent years, more and more companies are springing up and advertising solar panels. This, in turn, has lead to more people installing solar panels on their homes – so you may be wondering if this is the move for you.

Having solar panels fitted to your roof is expensive, no doubt about it. The installation varies from $4000 to $60,000. The difference depends on the size of your house, your requirements from the panels themselves and how much electricity you are hoping to generate. In basic terms, the larger the panels and the more you want – the bigger your bill, though even a basic system can be tough on the wallet.

Firstly, most solar panel installation companies will offer some form of credit – perhaps even ‘buy now pay later’ type deals, which allow you to suspend repayments for a year or more. Almost all will offer a traditional credit scheme, where you have the panels installed and then pay them off. This is one of the most expensive ways to get solar panels installed, as you will be charged for the credit, but nevertheless it is an option.

The best way option for most is to save a dedicated fund for their solar panels. Using the old school system of putting a little money by each week, many households can afford solar panels within a couple of years without having to pay credit purchase rates.

Whichever way you choose to do it, solar panels are expensive. There isn’t any way of getting around that, though as the technology improves prices should fall. It is always worth remember, however, that solar power is beneficial both to your wallet in the long run, and to the environment.

The Past May Be Dim, But The Future Is Bright For Solar Energy

August 24, 2009 by  
Filed under Wind And Solar Energy

Where would we be without inventions? Well, the answer is fairly easy to surmise; sitting around in our mud huts hoping the cow will produce some milk, and that our vegetables will grow. Inventions have given humans the edge over the other species on the planet, as our collaborative minds create a new world bigger and better than the one before.

The problem is, humans are fallible – and what’s more, arrogant. Humans have, throughout the centuries, had an uncanny ability to invent things that will improve our lives forever – but we’re just as likely to boast about our discoveries, too. This desire to show the world what we have uncovered and just how very clever we are has lead to many good inventions being tried before they were ready; they subsequently failed, and the idea was pushed to the back of a drawer, banished from history forever.

The inventions that have survived have done so for one of two reasons: firstly, the inventor was wise enough to perfect his invention before unveiling it to the general public in a blaze of glory. Or, as is more likely, a good idea may have experienced a bad start, but has been good enough for people to persist and perfect the technology as it works along.

Solar panels very nearly suffered the fate of numerous other inventions that were revealed to the public too soon and proven to be disastrous, thus shoved to the back of the drawer and forgotten about. Excited scientists proudly told the world how the dependence on fossil fuels would be able to end, and all thanks to something called solar panels and their ability to generate electricity.

Yet they went public too soon, with an imperfect technology, and solar panels quickly got a reputation as unreliable. However, the idea stuck, and now we exist in a world where solar panels are almost becoming the norm. Solar panels have thus proven that even after a bad start, the good ideas tend to stick.