Solar Revolution – Sphelar : Spherical Solar Cell : DigInfo

May 20, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

movie.diginfo.tv DigInfo News Embracing the move towards renewable energy sources, Kyosemi have revolutionized the design of the traditional solar cell, increasing it’s power generation efficiency and paving the way for innovative applications and a more economical use of raw materials. Sphelar is a spherical micro solar cell, which unlike traditional flat solar cells, can effectively harness reflected and diffused solar light as well as direct light from all directions. Each cell, is 1 to 1.5 mm and can be connected in parallel or in series, allowing for a limitless range of shapes and uses including flexible solar cells, round solar cells, or power-generating windows for buildings or offices while maintaining a certain level of transparency. Also, compared to the production process for traditional solar cells there is a dramatic reduction in the amount of wasted silicon. “In the process of producing spherical spolar cells, molten silicon is used. It’s dripped from an elevated position, and crystallizes as a sphere in mid-air, so using this process no silicon is wasted in the production of solar cells.” Kyosemi have also developed the SphelarVoice which is a battery-free wireless audio optical information system that receives information via infrared rays. The SphelarVoice uses an array of LEDs to emit a light signal which is recieved by the solar cells, converted into an electrical signal on the battery-free wireless handset and sent to the speaker.

6 Watt Solar Panel 2 Watt LED Light Emitting Diode Indoor Outdoor Lighting

May 14, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

www.greenpowerscience.com This is a direct solar to lighting application using a very efficient LED bulb setup. The Solar Panel is a very small 6 watt Amorphous Cell. Solar Training Solar Career Options.

Solar Panels and Overcast Days

August 24, 2009 by  
Filed under Wind And Solar Energy

There is a general misconception that solar panels, used to generate electricity and energy from the sun, do not work on overcast or cloudy days. This continues into the belief that solar panels are only useful during the summer months, rendering this form of renewable energy somewhat useless for half of the year during winter.

It is easy to understand where these misconceptions come from. Solar panels need solar light (and it is assumed, heat) to function; without sun rays hitting the panels, it would make sense that no energy could be produced.

However, there is a difference in what we consider to be the sun’s power and what is the actual power of the sun. We as humans associate solar rays with strong, yellow sunshine in a cloudless sky; the kind of weather conditions that have you reaching for a hat and for sunblock. While solar panels will flourish in these conditions, just because the sky is overcast or the temperature is low does not mean solar panels will cease to function.

This is because the sun is always casting rays down on earth, even if there is cloud cover interrupting its route to the surface of our planet. Many people each year, much to their surprise, find themselves suffering sunburn on what appeared to be a cloudy and overcast day. This is because the sunlight is still getting through, but it is just more filtered and obstructed than usual.

For solar energy, the important part of the above sentence is that the sun is still getting through. Even when we would consider the sun not to be shining, it is – unless it is night time! Solar panels are therefore able to function in most weather conditions, albeit with reduced output.