The Future Of Solar Energy

May 25, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

Experts have suggested that solar-powered energy can become a significant and cost-efficient replacement for fossil fuels in the near future, but will the government help? Tony Guida reports.

SOLAR PANEL WITH A FRESNEL LENS CPV CONCENTRATED PHOTOVOLTAIC PV SOLAR CONCENTRATOR FREE ENERGY

May 19, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

www.greenpowerscience.com Boosting the power of a solar panel by using a Fresnel Lens and doubling the sunlight reaching the panel.

A Delicious New Solar Cell Technology

May 15, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

Researchers demonstrate a new solar cell technology based entirely on powdered donuts and passion tea. Please vote on Nanotation Video contest entry here: community.acs.org Copyright: All Rights Reserved by Blake Farrow

Solar Powered Car

May 12, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

Why aren’t we all driving on sunlight? Learn more at deathstroke.net

Green Job Training 80 WATT SOLAR PANEL Grid Tie Inverter Direct Monocrystalline

May 1, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

Green Jobs Training. www.greenpowerscience.com SOLAR PANELS SOLAR CO-OP This is a Monocrystalline Solar panel rated at 80 watts. This panel in direct sunlight can power a GTI Grid tie inverter providing 63 watts AC alternating current supplementing the power consumption from the electric company grid. The GTI is a 200 watt version. 3 panels would be needed in parallel to run direct at full power.

See Through Solar Cells

May 1, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

Fifty years inthe making, solar-power cells are still flat, rigid, and ugly. But new research shows how they could be made lightweight, flexible, and transparent. These innovations could expand solar-cell use to things like solar fabrics and power generating windows. www.sciencentral.com

Intense Solar Power

April 20, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

Sir Charles uses a beam of concentrated sunlight to melt a brick

Solar Power 101 – how does sunlight turn into electricity

April 13, 2011 by  
Filed under Wind and Solar

Please sign the Declaration of Endependence at www.endependence.info/declaration . Short and concise explanation of solar photovoltaic systems. How do they work? Do I need batteries? Produced by the on-line local action network, Endependence.info. Show us how you are saving energy. We’ll copy your great ideas. Energy independence, we can’t do it alone, but we can do it together.

The PS10 Tower: The Future of Energy Generation?

August 24, 2009 by  
Filed under Wind And Solar Energy

Just outside of the city of Seville in Spain, one can see a monolith that largely resembles something from the Lord of the Rings. A huge, towering eye stands a 115 meter high tower, looking out over a sea of large, shiny reflective objects. To the innocent bystander it is an odd, or even alarming sight, but what is happening in this small corner of Spain could indeed be the future of energy.

The monolith is in fact a PS10 tower, a technical name for what is essentially a huge solar panel. Like many solar panels, it gathers the sun’s heat and boils water to create steam; this, in turn, creates electricity, which can then be used to power anything from a small town to the oven in your kitchen.

What makes the PS10 Tower different, however, is that it does not just receive sunlight directly from the sun. While it would be effective in doing so, the PS10 Tower looks out over 624 movable mirrors, known as heliostats, all of which are positioned to shine the sun’s rays directly onto the solar panels atop the tower.

If it sounds complicated, that’s because it is – but essentially, what the PS10 Tower generates in power which then becomes electricity is 624 times more powerful than your average solar panel. Thanks to the heliostats bouncing the sun’s rays directly on to its receiving panels, the PS10 is able to create steam to drive a generator at a rate previously unheard of for solar technology.

What’s more, the experiment has proved so successful that a second tower and second bed of heliostats – the PS20 Tower – has now been built. The Spanish have capitalized on their natural resource – blinding sunlight – and used it to create electricity. Even more excitingly, it works. So is are the PS10 and PS20 towers the future of solar energy? They just might be.

Would Solar Power Save You Money?

August 24, 2009 by  
Filed under Wind And Solar Energy

You’ve probably heard it all before; solar power is the answer to the world’s energy crisis, and what’s more installing solar panels in and on your home will save you money on energy bills. With utility bills, particularly electricity, increasing all the time – it’s no wonder that more and more people are seeking alternatives.

So, basically, the blurb is good. Solar power is good, and it is truly a way forward. At this point, with interest piqued, many will begin to wonder if they genuinely can save money and the environment by investing in solar panels.

Solar panels can be placed anywhere; the most effective place for the average household is on the roof, where exposure to sunlight is at its highest. And while you may feel the stories of cut price energy bills are a little bit too good to be true, the simple fact is by switching to solar power you will save money. Yes, everyone.

Solar panels can replace your dependence on electricity and gas – two of the most used utilities in any given home. For the first few years what you save will be largely offset by the cost of the solar panels being installed, but most companies estimate that people will genuinely be saving money by their seventh or eighth year with solar panels. Reduction in energy bills could be as high as 30% – no matter what or who you are, from a tiny flat to a large six bedroom detached house.

Purchasing and installing solar panels should be seen as an investment rather than a quick fix for your energy bills soaring. However, there are various grants and loans available for people wishing to help switch their homes to solar energy – check your local authority to see if you, and the environment, could benefit.

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